Fleury-Joseph Crépin

1875 - 1948 Hénin-Liétard, France

Fleury-Joseph Crépin 
Zonder titel, 1941 | Untitled, 1941
Olieverf op canvas | Oil on canvas
57 x 65 cm
Fleury-Joseph Crépin Zonder titel, 1941 | Untitled, 1941 Olieverf op canvas | Oil on canvas 57 x 65 cm
Fleury-Joseph Crépin Fleury-Joseph Crépin 
Zonder titel, 1941 | Untitled, 1941
Olieverf op canvas | Oil on canvas
57 x 65 cm
Fleury-Joseph Crépin Fleury-Joseph Crépin Zonder titel, 1941 | Untitled, 1941 Olieverf op canvas | Oil on canvas 57 x 65 cm
Fleury-Joseph Crépin Fleury-Joseph Crépin 
Zonder titel, 1940 | Untitled, 1940
Olieverf op canvas | Oil on canvas
69 x 51 cm
Fleury-Joseph Crépin Fleury-Joseph Crépin Zonder titel, 1940 | Untitled, 1940 Olieverf op canvas | Oil on canvas 69 x 51 cm

Fleury-Joseph Crépin plies several trades before opening a hardware store. In 1930, he is initiated into spiritualism and creates his first compositions, going on to...

Fleury-Joseph Crépin plies several trades before opening a hardware store. In 1930, he is initiated into spiritualism and creates his first compositions, going on to produce in all 345 oils on canvas. Based on the principle of symmetry, they represent temples and are built up in accordance with a unique technique: the whole picture is dotted with drops of paint that modulate the flat zones of color. Crépin was convinced that WWII would end once he finished painting his 300th picture. This came to pass, since the work in question is dated May 7, 1945, VE Day.

The first letters Fleury-Joseph wrote to Jean Dubuffet date from 1946. Dubuffet discovered his work in the Union Spirite Française exhibition in the Galerie Lefranc in Paris and was so fascinated by it that he decided to photograph it. Works by Fleury-Joseph were then put up for sale at the Foyer de l’Art Brut and then included in the Collection de l’Art Brut.